Editorial Director: Giusella Finocchiaro
Web Content Manager: Giulia Giapponesi

posted by admin on aprile 22, 2016

Privacy

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On the 14th of April 2016, more than four years after the European Commission proposal, the European Parliament approved at second reading the Regulation on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data.

The incessant technological progress of the last few years, the result product of an information society which has become increasingly more intrusive in people’s private lives, had on the one hand highlighted the inadequacy of European data protection legislation Directive 95/46/EC, formulated in the first stages of the digital revolution and on the other underlined the regulatory fragmentation that the implementation of the Directive had caused in the Member States. Thus, the Regulation meets the long awaited need to reform the legislation on personal data protection extending the number of rights for data subjects compared to those provided by the Directive and to bring into line the different legislations of the Member States, as a means to also strengthening the internal European market. In that sense the choice of the European legislator to adopt the instrument of the Regulation is a significant one in that, in contrast with the Directive it does not require acts of transposition, as it can be directly and identically applied in each Member State.

Among the most significant recommendations introduced by the Regulation, of particular relevance seems to be the new local scope of application in accordance with art. 3. Directive 95/46/EC previously provided for the regulation to be applicable by means of the national legislations when personal data were processed in the framework of the activities of a data controller’s establishment physically present in the European Union. Therefore, the fundamental criterion for defining the scope of applicability of the Directive was the physical location in which the data were processed. Today, this criterion seems to have been overturned by art. 3, paragraph 1 of the Regulation, which defines the applicability of the act “regardless of whether or not the processing takes place in the Union”. Already over the last two years, from the Google Spain ruling to the recent Schrems decision, the orientation, which has become definite in the European Court of Justice’s case-law, has highlighted a trend towards a less restrictive interpretation of this criterion.

In fact, it seems that the will has also arisen to extend European legislation to cases in which data controllers are non-European subjects and data are mainly processed outside Europe. Now, art. 3 of the Regulation seems in a certain sense to have codified the Court’s broadened interpretation by providing multiple connecting criteria that also allow those cases of data processing which previously had been difficult to include, to be drawn into the sphere of application of the regulatory provision. The Regulation is now applicable not only to data processing performed in the context of the activities of a data controller’s establishment within the Union, but also in the case of a data processor’s establishment. Moreover, it is applicable when the data processing activities are related to an offer of goods or services, even if free of charge, to interested data subjects within the European Union, or when they are related to the monitoring of the such data subjects’ behaviour, even if the data controllers or processors are not settled in the European Union.

The reform introduces various innovations, among which the provision of a new range of rights for data subjects (for example the right to be forgotten and the right to data portability), the placing of more responsibilities on subjects involved in the processing of personal data (in particular the obligation for data controllers to carry out privacy impact assessments and to notify of data breaches), new safeguards for the transfer of data abroad in addition to the confirmation of the two regulatory authorities represented by the Data Protection Officer and the Supervisory Authority.

With regard to coordination with the European legislation (the Regulation will be applicable after a two year period from the date of entry into force), the Italian legislator will have to choose which of the two alternative routes to follow: either the direct application of the Regulation, which would imply the abrogation of all national provisions incompatible with the European legislation, or the integration of the current Italian Personal Data Code, despite the inevitable risks of erroneous transpositions or misinterpretations of the European provisions.

 

 

posted by admin on ottobre 14, 2011

Anonymity

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We’d like to present here an interview with Giusella Finocchiaro on The Dilemmas of Anonymity and Anonymous Data in the Digital Economy. The interview has been published by Nymity news on the section “Interviews with Expert”.

The dilemma is if anonymity and anonymous data exist in the present technological environment or if technology renders anonymity and anonymous data impossible.

The fundamental question is the very definition of anonymity and of anonymous data.

The concept of anonymity has gained particular importance in relation to the application of the European legislation on personal data protection. This regulation is constituted by the Directive 95/46/EC on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data and by the Directive 2002/58/EC on privacy and electronic communications. The only data which are not “personal data” and therefore are outside the field of the application of the two directives are “anonymous data”…

Read more on: Nimity News

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